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Thread: Locator beacon

  1. mudgudgeon's Avatar
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    #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Myst View Post
    The other ones that i've tested are the SPOT satellite messengers and the Delorme In-Reach. Both send distress signals to an offshore service provider who then forward the information to the Australian search and rescue coordination centre (RCC). Both have issues with transmission in overcast, smokey or foggy conditions or areas of thick to moderate scrub, both have relatively small battery lives and both require subscriptions paid annually.
    I've read several reports of extremely poor response times from the SPOT system. It uses privately operated system. the signal is received by a private company, than relayed to relevant authorities. I've read enough bad reports that I wouldn't take a chance on it. If I'm going to carry a beacon, I want to be 100% sure its worth lugging around/

    the prices of these have come down heaps!

    A few years ago, I bought a second hand unit for more than the current new prices. the used one I bought was from a reputable shop, was tested and came with a warranty. They were supplying beacons to the Sydney to Hobart yacht race fleet, the beacons had only been used for a few days. Could still be an option for someone on a budget.

    these things have an expiry date because battery life can't be guaranteed beyond the expiry date. You can get batteries changed and get units re-certified, but it would probably cost more than a new one.

    My unit has a test function on it so you can verify that it is working without triggering a distress signal
  2. mudgudgeon's Avatar
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    #22
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveL View Post
    We would be in the minority. So many don't. I reckon it's a great feature. I log on and let them know when and where I will be on remote type trips. If the beacon goes off it will undoubtedly save time not having to call relatives etc, to see if it's a false alarm - valuable time if the crap has hit the fan.
    not trying to be argumentative, but do they seriously check with relatives first? If my unit is registered to my address in Shytney (yes it is) and I trigger it in the middle of the boonies, surely they don't go and check with relatives first. If I'm in the sticks, how are relatives going to have a clue if its a false alarm or not? Isn't that the point of them? they give you a safety net when no other communication is available
  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by mudgudgeon View Post
    not trying to be argumentative, but do they seriously check with relatives first? If my unit is registered to my address in Shytney (yes it is) and I trigger it in the middle of the boonies, surely they don't go and check with relatives first. If I'm in the sticks, how are relatives going to have a clue if its a false alarm or not? Isn't that the point of them? they give you a safety net when no other communication is available
    Yes they do. Your contact should know things about you that can help the guys be more prepared when they get to you. Things like, age, fitness, previous injuries, allergies, or any other details that will help and you might not be able to give them because you are injured.
  4. Myst's Avatar
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    #24
    Quote Originally Posted by jindydiver View Post
    Yes they do. Your contact should know things about you that can help the guys be more prepared when they get to you. Things like, age, fitness, previous injuries, allergies, or any other details that will help and you might not be able to give them because you are injured.
    ^^ This

    The first point of call the RCC makes is the beacon database when an EPIRB (vessels), ELT (aircraft) or PLB (personal beacons) goes off. They call the listed numbers, starting with the owners, then the emergency contacts. In a lot of instances the beacon has been activated inadvertantly, so it wards off unneccessary responses.

    I wrote an article in Arrowhead a couple of years back on beacons - will see if i can find a copy of it to post up.
    Alan Specketer

    I am currently experiencing life at a rate of several WTF's a minute
  5. mudgudgeon's Avatar
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    #25
    Cheers guys.
    Might update my registration then.
  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Myst View Post
    It will not work in areas with no phone service. With rescue beacons now under $300 for seven to ten years service life, its a cheap investment that can potentially save your life.

    The other ones that i've tested are the SPOT satellite messengers and the Delorme In-Reach. Both send distress signals to an offshore service provider who then forward the information to the Australian search and rescue coordination centre (RCC). Both have issues with transmission in overcast, smokey or foggy conditions or areas of thick to moderate scrub, both have relatively small battery lives and both require subscriptions paid annually.
    The whole notion of taking a shortcut - with something designed to save your life - does not resonate with me at all.

    Because of smoke, fog, mountains and being 165 km (or more) from the nearest mobile service, Personal Locator Beacons or PLBs are a must in the remoter areas of the Alpine National Park.

    You have to literally carry them with you. Not much good if you have your bow and your daypack - and it's back at fly camp. Like another poster, I use ACR ResQlink and I have never had to trigger it, fortunately. I have considered Satellite phones but several I have seen have been heavy, expensive and ultimately less reliable than a PLB.

    No system is perfect - but this is as good as it gets. If I fall and am injured, I might not be in a condition to trigger it. This may result in death from exposure, but then, if that is so, then not much can save me.
  7. #27
    I have a Satt phone and no bigger than a decent UHF size wise but yes they are expensive but least I can still contact the family if required.

    Good thread

    Cheers

    Sneak
    Stick, String and Sharp Things what could possibly go wrong?

    Sneak, Sneak, Sneak, Whack!!!

    RUN BOY RUN UPA TREE UPA TREE!!!!
  8. Myst's Avatar
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    #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Sneaky View Post
    I have a Satt phone and no bigger than a decent UHF size wise but yes they are expensive but least I can still contact the family if required.

    Good thread

    Cheers

    Sneak
    Hey Sneak,
    problem with sat phones is they (1) require fine motor skills to use properly, (2) require someone else to pick up at the other end, (3) rely on you being able to communicate effectively with the person on the other end, and (4) dont transmit a position to a third party like a radio or beacon. They also dont transmit a localised homing beacon like an EPIRB/ ELT/ PLB.

    Something most people dont realise is that beacons (in all their forms) transmit on two frequencies - 406mhz which goes to satellite and is sent to Earth to the RCC; and 123mhz which is a short range transmission used by emergency responders equipped with the correct direction finding equipment to hone in on the beacons physical location within 5km - even GPS equipped beacons wont give a precise position to the metre, but they will get responders close enough to use the DF gear.

    123mhz is also an international distress freq, so commercial aircraft flying overhead can detect and report the signal.

    In a situation where you are incapacitated, having that localised homing signal could make the difference between survival or not.
    Alan Specketer

    I am currently experiencing life at a rate of several WTF's a minute
  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Myst View Post
    Hey Sneak,
    problem with sat phones is they (1) require fine motor skills to use properly, (2) require someone else to pick up at the other end, (3) rely on you being able to communicate effectively with the person on the other end, and (4) dont transmit a position to a third party like a radio or beacon. They also dont transmit a localised homing beacon like an EPIRB/ ELT/ PLB.

    Something most people dont realise is that beacons (in all their forms) transmit on two frequencies - 406mhz which goes to satellite and is sent to Earth to the RCC; and 123mhz which is a short range transmission used by emergency responders equipped with the correct direction finding equipment to hone in on the beacons physical location within 5km - even GPS equipped beacons wont give a precise position to the metre, but they will get responders close enough to use the DF gear.

    123mhz is also an international distress freq, so commercial aircraft flying overhead can detect and report the signal.

    In a situation where you are incapacitated, having that localised homing signal could make the difference between survival or not.
    G'day Al,

    Watch this mate
    https://youtu.be/GuTvYpLXgpM

    My satt phone is

    Grab n Go 9575 Handset Bundle

    $1,945 (GST incl.)

    Package is available when you connect to an eligible Telstra Mobile Satellite Plan for 24 months. Minimum cost based on a 24-month TMS 35 plan ($35 per month) is $2,785 (excluding usage charges).

    I do use it for work so I am fortunate however it is easy to use, slight delay but a lot better than the old girls I used to use, holds battery power well, I have never tried the SOS Button but for it to work it must be registered and for the price it damn should work.

    Anyhow I can ring anyone mate someone always picks up and you can SMS also.

    Like I said expensive option but it pays for itself at work.

    Sneaky
    Stick, String and Sharp Things what could possibly go wrong?

    Sneak, Sneak, Sneak, Whack!!!

    RUN BOY RUN UPA TREE UPA TREE!!!!
  10. assassin's Avatar
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    #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Myst View Post
    ^^ This

    The first point of call the RCC makes is the beacon database when an EPIRB (vessels), ELT (aircraft) or PLB (personal beacons) goes off. They call the listed numbers, starting with the owners, then the emergency contacts. In a lot of instances the beacon has been activated inadvertantly, so it wards off unneccessary responses.

    I wrote an article in Arrowhead a couple of years back on beacons - will see if i can find a copy of it to post up.
    I read that article Alan, and that is why I bought a PLB! And also why I registered my details, and update them as they may change...

    Cheers,

    Mick



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