Arrowhead Magazine
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  1. #11
    Cheers, it looks and feels insane in the hand, I guess its limited in what you can do with it but, the main issue is cutting anything your going to eat as the nature of obsidian is to flake off IMG_20180105_170145.jpg and no one wants to ingest shards of the sharpest material in the world.
    So a clever primitive hunter would carry a tool to regularly refine the blade to keep the edge free from flakes and survive long enough to make more clever primitive hunters.
    Im keen to at least flesh some hides with it and for salted skins there's no rust issues with the salt on the blade.
    It seems to perform best on natural fibres too, even tough chit like flax, yucca, sinew and hide.
    If exposed to enough sunlight it will lose its color and eventually be clear.
    Cheers for looking bow hunters
    Last edited by Rhino1; 8th January 2018 at 12:57 PM.
  2. #12
    amazing job bud, time/ skills pays the bills
    Live Forever Or Die Trying.
  3. #13
    Hey Rhino a friend naps his own down , glad to see your into a very cool age old artIMG_0693.jpgIMG_0686.jpgIMG_0700.jpg
  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Stork View Post
    Hey Rhino a friend naps his own down , glad to see your into a very cool age old artIMG_0693.jpgIMG_0686.jpgIMG_0700.jpg
    Absolutely beautiful, I can definitely appreciate the workmanship in those ones stork, your mate does a great job thanks very much for posting those pics for all to see.
    Sometimes I just wish I could just sit down and rest but my brain doesnt stop, so in my spare time I make knives both carbon steel and glass, I do leather work, self bows, laminated bows and have been volunteering in reptile/amphimpian/invertebrate research for UQ and Queensland museum since 2001, I also collect and cut gemstones, stabilize various timbers and it just goes on and on mate.
    One day I'm going to buy a 6 pack on the way home from work and sit on the couch for 10 minutes and see what that's like, but I just built a new shed (in a day) overlooking what has to be one of the most gorgeous creeks in s.e qld, which gets the creative juices flowing so it won't be anytime soon.
    I'm also back on property again and try to produce as much of my own food as possible, tonights dinner was fresh caught bass and mango smoked redclaw with bullrush root and native fig and lilly pilly sauce.
    Live like a king mate and preserve our natural heritage.
    IMG_20180304_105846.jpg
    Kind Regards Ryan "Rhino" Stone.
  5. #15
    I have a heap of obsidian and would love to have a go at this...how do i break it up and what do i use to shape it...any help appreciated
    hunting the new england
  6. clinton miller's Avatar
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    #16
    brett, there is a wealth of info on the net. you tube is the best place to start. like it has been taught for millennia, it is best to watch someone doing it. tools are simple and can be made by yourself. copper and antler billets, hammer stones which are simply ideally shaped river stones and pressure flakers. i highly recommend an assortment of punches for indirect percussion. a method where a punch (some what like an over sized pressure flaker) is held on the rock then struck with a billet. this allows removal of flakes that simply can't be removed any other way. it opened up a new world for me.

    if i can make it to the group hunt we could have a knapping session around a fire.
    The degree of satisfaction gained from the accomplishment of a goal is directly proportional to the hardships and challenges overcome in order to achieve it.

    Border Black Douglas recurve 70# & 58# HEX6-H BB2 limbs
    brigalow selfbow with rawhide string
  7. #17
    Brett it can be expensive to start with bought obsidian and quite often the grain doesn't run how you want it to, I turned a $60 chunk into fish tank gravel on my first go.
    The old style thick as fark computer and TV screens are a good start, as are thick glass bottle bases and before someone brings it up yes some glass screens have lead in it and no its not a problem if you wash your hands, (remember bcf sells sinkers like tic tacs and no one gives a second thought about leaving them in our local waterways).
    Eye protection is a definite must, and give some thought about where to do it as you just can't pick every shard and sliver.
    There is no shortage of information as uncle Clint already mentioned
  8. #18
    Brett it can be expensive to start with bought obsidian and quite often the grain doesn't run how you want it to, I turned a $60 chunk into fish tank gravel on my first go.
    The old style thick as fark computer and TV screens are a good start, as are thick glass bottle bases and before someone brings it up yes some glass screens have lead in it and no its not a problem if you wash your hands, (remember bcf sells sinkers like tic tacs and no one gives a second thought about leaving them in our local waterways).
    Eye protection is a definite must, and give some thought about where to do it as you just can't pick every shard and sliver.
    There is no shortage of information as uncle Clint already mentioned
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