Bowhunting Downunder
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  1. disco stu's Avatar
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    #1

    R rating for sleep mats

    So I've been thinking about sleep matts lately. Thinking about getting an inflatable hiking style, something like the Klymit after getting mentioned on here.

    What I'm wondering about is the R rating and what I should aim at here? Preferably I would like to use the same matt in summer and winter. I guess mostly in coastal type areas, but then I could easily head into places where it gets below freezing at night etc, both fishing and hunting. I wasn't sure if a warmer one would keep me too warm in summer, but I'm thinking my mattress at home would have a decent rating and it doesn't really overheat me from underneath.

    Been thinking about other things that might give a bit more warmth as well. Maybe like having a reflective sheet/space blanket underneath the mattress to try and reflect some heat back. Been thinking about covering my ice box in that as well, hopefully stop the box absorbing as much warmth in the summer.

    Anyway, keen to hear your thoughts on all of this.

    Cheers

    Stu
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  2. #2
    You sure do think a hell of a lot Stu lol.
    I'm quite interested in this topic too. I live in Rockhampton, up in Cntrl Qld, its the kind of place when people ask how your winter was, you answer by saying something like 'Oh it was OK, I think it fell on a Wednesday?'
    We really don't get properly cold up here unless you head west and even then it doesn't stay cold through the day.
    I'm more used to struggling to keep cool and how to keep the mosquitoes at bay but for the occasional trip to a cold climate, I'll be following this thread closely.
    Last edited by Paul Graham 1967; 24th March 2018 at 11:59 PM.
  3. #3
    I remember my old thermarest self inflatable from camping.. With the 10mm foam underlay which had silver reflective side on it.. Wasn't that great for cold and any tiny rock was a pain. But hey, being young I dealt with it.
    I'm older now, rather take a thicker non inflatable. Bulk and weight are higher, so I just don't travel as far. But it's a crap load more comfortable.
    -= The Matter is Void =-
  4. #4
    Stu I have a sea to summit comfort plus dual layer inflatable insulated mat with an R rating of 5. This mat is advertised as being able to sleep directly on top of snow. I haven't used it in extreme cold conditions yet but it does insulate well against the cold coming up without overheating. The older I get the more comfort I look for & spending a few extra $$ on sleeping gear is money well spent.

    I also got one of the Sea to Summit Air stream dry sacks to inflate the matt. Literally takes seconds to inflate the mat.

    Bert
    Last edited by Hunterbyname&bynature; 25th March 2018 at 08:56 AM.
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  5. disco stu's Avatar
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    #5
    You sure do think a hell of a lot Stu lol.
    It's because I'm just so damn smart....and humble! Nah, I'm generally bouncing some idea around my head about something, and then can't follow through because I'm broke!

    I remember my old thermarest self inflatable from camping.. With the 10mm foam underlay which had silver reflective side on it.. Wasn't that great for cold and any tiny rock was a pain. But hey, being young I dealt with it.
    Thinking about some of the sleeping I did on rock ledges on just a foam roll mat. Best way I found was to position within a joint in the rocks where it had eroded a bit more, then I could sort of snuggle down into that. I can't believe I would wake up feeling better there than at home in bed.

    The style I'm looking at is actually a thin (~5-6cm) air mattress type, rather than thin self inflating mat. They seem to be lighter and keep you off the ground better. I think if I was going self inflating mat again I would just stick with foam roll mat for insulation, as I don't think they were any more comfortable

    Stu I have a sea to summit comfort plus dual layer inflatable insulated mat with an R rating of 5. This mat is advertised as being able to sleep directly on top of snow.
    That's good info, thanks. Have you used it in really warm conditions at all? It's only a few hundred grams to add the insulation, so it seems wise to get one that is warmer.

    How do you find the width of it? I'm a side sleeper, so i guess I don't need that wide, but I do find myself falling off the side of many mats during the night, which is also why I prefer not too high off the ground

    I'm tempted to try a cheaper Naturehike one off ebay first. At least that way I can work out what features I really want or hate as well. I'm forever on a budget, so need to be careful with wasting the money. The reviews I've read about them seem to say they are pretty good for the money. Generally priced at around $30-40, except for simply best prices, they are selling them for $275!! I saw some cats whisker string silencers they advertised the other day for $150 or so....bargain

    Appreciate the comments guys, thanks
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  6. #6
    A thought for you stu... If it's hot during the day then the ground is hot and radiates heat during the evening... Doesn't really absorb much in the way of body heat anyhow..
    A well insulated matress under you could actually be cooler.. Potentially anyhow. Not sure if anyone has actually tested that.
    -= The Matter is Void =-
  7. disco stu's Avatar
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    #7
    Hmmm-good point!
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  8. #8
    Width is fine for me, I sleep mostly on my side but also flat on my back. Have used it warmish 25-30 deg overnight conditions and I don't think overheating will be too much of an issue with any of the mats.
    One feature I really like with mine is it has 2 air cells so you inflate the bottom one tight to get you off the ground and the top one as soft or hard as you like for comfort. Added advantage is that if you get a hole in one side you can still inflate and sleep on it
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  9. disco stu's Avatar
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    #9
    Cheers Bert, good info. I thought that double layer was a great idea
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  10. stuie88's Avatar
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    #10

    R rating for sleep mats

    Quote Originally Posted by disco stu View Post
    ... inflatable hiking style, something like the Klymit...
    The klymit mats are really good, especially for the cost.
    Me, both my brothers, my wife, my sister in law and my dad all use the same model, klymit insulated static v.

    Between us we've used them in snow and summer in NE vic, tassie, used em in the NT. Really comfy, my dads back is rooted and he loves it.
    R rating 4.4, warm enough on a cold night, my brother and I slept through a cold snap that dumped several centimetres of snow on the tents and we were comfy.

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