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  1. #11
    Cheers Westy

    G'day Stuart
    Do a good search and have a read first then ask some questions that are specific to the hunting you do. Someone could write a book on possibilities and still manage to not include something.

    To get you started, look for info on Q Fever, Leptospirosis and Brucellosis. These are the diseases that you find in stock and game that you can catch directly from handling your kills (you need not eat anything to catch these, just being a hunter is a risk factor). There are other diseases that are common to both us and the game because they are ubiquitous and just being in the bush can lead to infection, things like Tetanus and Salmonella. Animals with obvious signs of infection with these are not fit for consumption. The problem is that you can't test in the field for them, you can only investigate your kill for fitness and reject it if it shows general signs of infection. If the animal has open wounds, lacks condition or has organs that are discoloured you can always lean on the side of caution, leave the carcase for the scavengers and shoot another one for the pot. Sometimes you might reject an animal because of general signs and never really know what it was infected with.
    There are also plenty of things that can effect the health of the game that have no direct effect on you. Things like liver fluke and intestinal worms. Q Fever, Leptospirosis and Brucellosis can also be in this basket if you take the proper precautions. Once you get your animal cleaned up properly it is good to go. Probably half the lamb and mutton (sourced from Southern NSW) you see at the butchers is from animals that were infected with Q Fever and the only people you see getting infected are people working with stock or with hot carcases.

    Google image search could help you with pics of infected organs.
  2. disco stu's Avatar
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    #12
    I'm going back through old posts trying to refresh myself on things, came across this and realised I never acknowledged or thanked for the replies. Very sorry about that guys. Really appreciate the advice. I think I went straight into searching out the things mentioned and forgot to reply I think.
    eject, EJECT!!
  3. disco stu's Avatar
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    #13
    Something I have been wondering, is that hand sanitiser stuff useful for killing these nasties on your hands? I figure they are all bacterial and this stuff kills bacteria, but I may be wrong. I thought as well as using gloves, might be a good idea to keep one of those small travel bottles in your kit to use after handling any animals
    eject, EJECT!!
  4. #14
    G'day Stu
    Nothing wrong with washing your hands afterwards, I have a bottle of that alcohol based cleaner in my bag all the time, but if the infection gets into any cuts on your hands no amount of washing will help after the fact. You can also catch Q Fever, Leptospirosis and Brucellosis when you wipe your face of sometimes if you breath in the dust off the animals. They are a risk of being out in the wild, you don't even have to be a hunter to catch them. The good news is that they are not that easy to catch that we need to stress over them.
  5. disco stu's Avatar
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    #15
    Thanks for that. I'll relax about all that then and just use that hand cleaner after handling animals. Appreciate your response
    eject, EJECT!!
  6. #16
    I found this thread after a bit of roaming around and thought I'd add a few comments.
    I've dealt with wildlife and animal dissections for quite a few years, always with disease and parasite transmission in mind. My approach was to consider all animals 'infectious' and use the appropriate protection every time.
    Steps I followed....
    Wash your hands, finger nails and forearms very well with an antiseptic/antibacterial wash.
    Cover any open lesions with non-porous tape.
    Wear good gloves, not those thin, ****ty latex ones, but a pair of blue nitrile disposable gloves.
    Use two separate knives (or sets of knives) and don't sharpen them with the same steel while they are dirty. Use one (set) for skinning and working on the outside of the animal and gutting, and another for boning out, butchering or slicing the meat.
    Work slowly, don't rush it and have a good knowledge of the anatomy of the animal before you begin. You don't want to slice into the bladder, stomach or gall bladder!
    ALWAYS bleach your gear and thoroughly clean yourself when you're done, your knives and hooks or any other gear that has been in contact with either hide, offal or meat need to be chemically cleaned (ie disinfectant, bleach)
    I often changed gloves throughout the process, especially if I had handled broken or cut bone where there was even a slim chance of compromising the glove.

    x2 what jindydiver has said, get some background information on the possible diseases or parasites that you might encounter. Some of them are quite resilient and go through various life cycles in different parts of the body. You can never be too careful.
    Having said all of that though, rarely did I see a heavily infectious animal. very often they were infected with intestinal worms, or worms under the skin but these are ofter overcome with good hygeine practices and thoroughly cooking the meat.
    Dispose of gloves, don't re-use them and always wash your hands and arms up to the elbow twice.
  7. #17
    Hi,

    Iíve tried looking on google for how to identify Q Fever, Leptospirosis and Brucellosis in game animals but am struggling to find anything that help me feel confident about avoiding diseased animals (if the liver and kidneys look spotty or rotten Iím sure Iíll give it a pass). Does anyone have any links comparing healthy and diseased organs or the swollen/puffy head and tail ends. This thread is great but Iím just looking for a visual comparison.

    Aif
  8. Ian Turner's Avatar
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    #18
    Hi all a few months ago there was an indepth article in Archery Action (i am sure it was ) in which the very knowledgeable author discussed the issue of Hydatids and other issues particularly the different types of worms. I will have to see if i can find the article and post it here.
    Cheers
  9. #19
    Thank mate it would be greatly appreciated :) google keeps giving me medical journals and pictures of random cows (that donít appear sick) I found a video on YouTube with some guy in the states that caught brucellosis and he discribed the symptoms and talks about his ongoing treatment. Silly fella knew he had cut his hand on bone fractures and kept harvesting his elk, no gloves, didnít wash his hands (just rinsed under water). So my kill kit now has gloves and other hygiene product hehehe.

    So glad that I ran across this thread, I alway assumed Ďmeh these animals are living free range with little to no human contact, if they donít have goop around their eyes and the organs donít look rotten then in the pot it goesí.

    Aif (0_o)
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